E-mail and search functions

  • University of Illinois
  • E-mail
  • A-Z Index

Applying for Faculty Jobs

Where to Look for Jobs

Tenure-track positions

  • Most institutions engage in national searches for tenure-track positions.
  • Faculty hiring follows the academic calendar, with most postings announced in the fall or early spring for positions to begin for the next fall term.
  • The timing for academic job postings varies by discipline, but most job searches will be concluded by the mid to late spring.
  • Job postings are usually advertised through disciplinary societies such as the American Chemical Society (ACS), Modern Language Association (MLA), or College Music Society (CMS). Talk with faculty in your department to learn where to look within your field.
  • Other places to look for tenure-track positions include:

Part-time and visiting positions

  • All institutions have the need for part-time and/or short-term faculty
  • Short-term, "visiting" positions of 1-3 years usually are advertised, and these positions may follow the same search and hiring practices as a tenure-track position.
  • The search process for other contingent faculty is often conducted without a formal search and may take place only a few weeks or days before the position is to begin.
  • If you want to be considered for adjunct positions at a specific institution (because perhaps you have geographical constraints), contact the department and send your CV and a letter explaining your interest in teaching at that institution.

Postdocs

  • Many postdoc positions in academe are never advertised. Be sure to talk with your adviser and other faculty, connect with others at conferences, and network broadly.
  • Some postdoc positions are advertised on institution websites, as well as through organizations like:

Application Materials

So you’ve found a job advertisement that you want to apply for. What’s next?
 
Most announcements will request a minimum of a curriculum vitae, a cover letter, and contact information for three references. You may be asked to submit these electronically via an institutional human resources application tool. In addition, other materials such as letters of recommendation and teaching and research statements may also be requested. Be sure to send EVERYTHING that is requested in the job advertisement by the deadline indicated.
 
Read the job posting carefully, paying careful attention to everything mentioned, including:
  • Institutional Focus. Is this college or university focused on research or teaching? Is it a graduate or undergraduate institution? Does the ad emphasize specific elements of teaching (i.e., writing-intensive, educational technologies, etc.) or research?
  • Specialization. What type of scholar is the institution looking for? Do you reasonably fit their requirements? Does the position title match your qualifications?
  • Degree requirements. Do you meet the minimum educational requirements for the position? If the position requires a PhD "in hand," and you are still finishing your dissertation, can you reasonably be done by their deadline?
  • Application materials & deadlines. Does the announcement indicate the date that review by the search committee will begin? What specific materials are requested for application?

For more suggestions about developing your materials, view the virtual workshop on "Fundamentals of Great Applications".