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Develop Forums/Opportunities for Students to Present their Research

Students presenting their research to external audiences is a key activity in graduate education. Developing and supporting opportunities for them to do that is of primary importance to graduate programs. Here are some ways in which our graduate programs accomplish that goal.

On campus

    Weekly Seminars
    Research Workshops
    Course-Based
    Co-Presenting

Often these are organized by graduate student groups, and they can also be used to recruit new students.

Off campus

Making travel funds available is another best practice that allows students to disseminate research more broadly and bring attention to your program.

Collaborating with Peer Programs can add apportunites for students to present their research.

 

On campus
Weekly Seminars

Aerospace Engineering: Graduate students advisory committee organizes seminars, and every other week students present.

 

Educational Psychology: We accomplish this by requiring students to attend and present their work at weekly department brown-bag seminars; co-publishing with students; co-presenting papers at conferences; supporting students to present papers/posters at conferences, and so on.

 

Program in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology: Our size allows us to build a strong sense of community. Students interact with other students, faculty and postdocs at our weekly seminar series, and with students from different graduate programs in their own lab groups. PEEC also contributes to the Graduates in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (GEEB), a registered student organization that coordinates graduate students interested in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. GEEB runs a weekly in-house seminar series (EcoLunch) for graduate students, postdocs and faculty.

 

Veterinary Clinical Medicine: All VCM grad students are required to participate in a sponsored Departmental Graduate Student seminar series, where our students present short talks on their research progress. These venues have increased the Department- and College-wide awareness of research efforts by VCM students and faculty, facilitated improvement in our student’s presentation and public speaking skills and increased programmatic compliance and completion rates.

 

Research Workshops

Atmospheric Sciences: We showcase our research in our annual research review, which is co-sponsored by the Departments of Geology and Geography. Here, each of our graduate students presents a poster describing their research in an annual event at the Alice Campbell Alumni Center. This gives graduate students an early opportunity to present research before attending a scientific conference.

 

Geology: One activity that worked out particularly well is the Annual Research Reviews for graduate students. This is organized entirely by students. Faculty are invited to judge on posters. The forum is effective in motivating students and increasing student/faculty interactions. It is also used for new graduate recruiting.

 

Graduate School of Library and Information Science: The Annual Research Showcase is an opportunity for all doctoral students to present short talks and/or posters highlighting their scholarly work. This also serves as a recruitment tool to encourage newly-admitted doctoral students to choose Illinois.

 

Program in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology: Each February GEEB coordinates a day-long seminar, during which current students give 15 minute presentations. Presentations are evaluated by faculty judges, and several awards are given.

 

Recreation, Sport & Tourism: Doctoral students are also drawn to the program by the cutting-edge, innovative approach to research and graduate student mentoring. For instance, in the Spring of 2011 the department initiated the Research Frontiers Videoconferencing Seminar that links top universities in the field in the US and Canada. The seminar involves research presentations and discussions by top scholars and graduate students in the field.

 

Statistics: The Department sponsors a student-oriented workshop, the Robert E. Bohrer Workshop, which features a well-known plenary speaker and a competition for student papers. The winner receives the Horace Norton prize for best student paper. Additional excellent papers are selected for oral presentations. This event is well attended by UIUC PhD students and faculty as well as faculty from neighboring universities. It is a great environment for PhD students and faculty to interact and discuss research and socialize.

 

Veterinary Clinical Medicine: Our grad students are also strongly encouraged to participate in the annual Phi Zeta Research Day presentations. In this competition, VCM grad students present the results of their research alongside presentations by more basic science-focused students from the Departments of Comparative Biosciences and Pathology.

 

Course-Based

Landscape Architecture: Our PhD Colloquium. We turned a loosely organized series of disconnected faculty research presentations into a tightly constructed introduction to the academy which the students value enough to voluntarily attend.

 

Co-Presenting

Special Education: We work extremely hard to create collegial, collaborative relationships between faculty and PhD students (i.e., it is not unusual for multiple faculty to mentor any given PhD student with co-authored presentations, co-authored publications, and co-teaching between the student and different faculty members).

 

Off campus
Funds

Linguistics: The doctoral program is also very successful in promoting the dissemination of student research with travel funds that allow students to present at regional, national and even international venues. These research engagements have helped to establish the UIUC Department of Linguistics as a leading source of research excellence from the next generation of linguistics and language researchers.

 

Philosophy: In recent years, the department has strongly encouraged students to submit their work to regional, national and international conferences. The department fully funds any travel involved. All stage three students are required to participate in a dissertation seminar at which they present parts of their dissertation research for feedback. These presentations, as well as seminar papers, frequently turn into conference submissions.